Coverart for item
The Resource The unicameral legislature of Vermont, by Daniel B. Carroll

The unicameral legislature of Vermont, by Daniel B. Carroll

Label
The unicameral legislature of Vermont
Title
The unicameral legislature of Vermont
Statement of responsibility
by Daniel B. Carroll
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
Conn. coll. for women, New London. Library
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1886-1959
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Carroll, Daniel B.
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
LC call number
F46
LC item number
.V55 n.s., vol.3
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Vermont Historical Society
Series statement
Proceedings of the Vermont Historical Society
Series volume
new series, v. 3 (1932)
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Vermont
  • Legislative bodies
Label
The unicameral legislature of Vermont, by Daniel B. Carroll
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Note
  • Caption title
  • Report of the society's ninety-fourth annual meeting, January 19, 1932, report of the librarian, and treasurer's report: p. iv-vii
  • "When the problem of second chambers is discussed, we frequently find that interest is confined to the subsidiary question of technique, omitting the prior question, Ẁhy have a second chamber?' It is in the main assumed that second chambers are universally valid, and therefore attention is centered on the varied methods of selection and the extent of functions. If the primary question is raised at all, it is invariably answered by an appeal to experience. It is claimed that almost all modern governments have for a considerable time had bicarmeral legislatures, and that it is hazardous to disregard a practice that is so nearly universal. Seldom is an attempt made to go beyond experience and to analyze critically this admittedly wide practice. In fact, a bicameral legislature is generally held to be an unassailable and eternal verity, one of few axioms of political science. Nevertheless, among the more systematic writers on political science the validity of the bicameral theory is far from unanimously supported. Even a hasty reference to the history of political ideas shows recurrent dissent. Thus, during the period of democratic ferment inaugurated by the French and American revolutions we find unmistakable opposition. To mention some examples, Samuel Adams, Pine, Turgot, Siéyès, and Condorcet were in favor of the unicameral form ... In no writer, perhaps do we find as vehement a defense of unicameralism as in Bentham ..."--Lewis Rockow, "Bentham on the theory of second chambers," in American political science review, August, 1928, pp. 576-577
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 79-85)
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
23 cm.
Extent
vii, 85 pages
Lccn
a 35001655 //r
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
  • CSUGAGN4413-B
  • (CSt)notisAGN4413
  • (OCoLC)03146785
Label
The unicameral legislature of Vermont, by Daniel B. Carroll
Publication
Copyright
Note
  • Caption title
  • Report of the society's ninety-fourth annual meeting, January 19, 1932, report of the librarian, and treasurer's report: p. iv-vii
  • "When the problem of second chambers is discussed, we frequently find that interest is confined to the subsidiary question of technique, omitting the prior question, Ẁhy have a second chamber?' It is in the main assumed that second chambers are universally valid, and therefore attention is centered on the varied methods of selection and the extent of functions. If the primary question is raised at all, it is invariably answered by an appeal to experience. It is claimed that almost all modern governments have for a considerable time had bicarmeral legislatures, and that it is hazardous to disregard a practice that is so nearly universal. Seldom is an attempt made to go beyond experience and to analyze critically this admittedly wide practice. In fact, a bicameral legislature is generally held to be an unassailable and eternal verity, one of few axioms of political science. Nevertheless, among the more systematic writers on political science the validity of the bicameral theory is far from unanimously supported. Even a hasty reference to the history of political ideas shows recurrent dissent. Thus, during the period of democratic ferment inaugurated by the French and American revolutions we find unmistakable opposition. To mention some examples, Samuel Adams, Pine, Turgot, Siéyès, and Condorcet were in favor of the unicameral form ... In no writer, perhaps do we find as vehement a defense of unicameralism as in Bentham ..."--Lewis Rockow, "Bentham on the theory of second chambers," in American political science review, August, 1928, pp. 576-577
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 79-85)
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
23 cm.
Extent
vii, 85 pages
Lccn
a 35001655 //r
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
  • CSUGAGN4413-B
  • (CSt)notisAGN4413
  • (OCoLC)03146785

Library Locations

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      3400 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19104, US
      39.954941 -75.193362
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